Art is divine

Real Life Dreamed Life

Micha Christos

TATE MODERN

 

LONDON

From July 18, 2019 to January 15, 2020

 

OLAFUR ELIASSON

IN REAL LIFE

Olafur Eliasson

Eine Beschreibung einer Reflexion, oder aber eine angenehme Übung zu deren Eigenschaften (A

description of a reflection or, a pleasant exercise on its qualities), 1995

Spotlight, mirrors, projection foil, motor, tripod Dimensions variable

Installation view: Tate Modern, London, 2019 Photo: Anders Sune Berg Boros Collection, Berlin

Olafur Eliasson In real life, 2019

Aluminium, colour-effect filter glass (green, yellow, orange, red, pink, cyan), LED light

Diameter 208 cm Installation view: Tate Modern, London, 2019 Photo: Anders Sune Berg

Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 2019 Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson (b.1967) Your uncertain shadow (colour), 2010 HMI lamps (green, orange, blue, magenta), glass, aluminium, transformers Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary Collection, Vienna Photo: María del Pilar García Ayensa/ Studio Olafur Eliasson

Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 2010 Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson

The presence of absence pavilion 2019 Bronze 200 x 100 x 100 cm

Installation view: Tate Modern, London  Photo: Anders Sune Berg

Courtesy the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery,

New York / Los Angeles  © 2019 Olafur Eliasson

 

 

The exhibition, «Olafur Eliasson in real life», was organized by Tate Modern in collaboration with the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao.

Olafur Eliasson, Danish Icelandic contemporary artist born in Copenhagen in 1967, has indeed established a very special link with the Tate Modern. In 2003, his meteorological project with its bright sun had already attracted more than two million visitors, and in 2018, his Ice Watch exhibition with pieces of ice from Greenland in London.

 

Once again and in a burning period on the subject, Olafur Eliasson reveals a work to bring a new perspective to the problems of climate change, energy, migration and architecture. 

Playing with natural phenomena such as rainbows, reflections and shadows, the artist’s works make us aware of our sensory perceptions, the beings around us and the universe as a whole.

This interaction with the world is made alive by many of the artist’s works on complex geometry, motion patterns and his keen interest in color theory. 

 

In his studio-laboratory, questioning and experimentation constitute the fundamental basis of his artistic approach. He connects design and science in notions of space and temporality. He thus succeeds in communicating domains whose common points have no obvious a priori. He likes to give a narrative dimension to each of his works so that it can leave a trace in the form of sensation or image in the memory of the spectators.


Olafur Eliasson

Din blinde passager (Your blind passenger), 2010

Fluorescent lamps, monofrequency lamps (yellow), fog machine, ventilator, wood, aluminium, steel, fabric, plastic sheet

Dimensions variable Installation view: Tate Modern, London, 2019 Photo: Anders Sune Berg

Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles © 2010 Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson in collaboration with Einar Thorsteinn Model room 2003

Wood table with steel legs, mixed media models, maquettes, prototypes Dimension variable Installation view: Tate Modern, London Photo: Anders Sune Berg 

Moderna Museet, Stockholm. Purchase 2015 funded by The Anna-Stina Malmborg and Gunnar Höglund Foundation. © 2003 Olafur Eliasson


 

 

 

 

 

 

Olafur Eliasson is deeply committed to society and the environment. This exhibition clearly shows this involvement by offering its visitors the opportunity to communicate directly with members of its team of more than 100 people in its Berlin studio.

 

This desire is reflected in the very heart of Tate Modern’s Terrace Bar, as Studio Olafur Eliasson’s kitchen team creates a special menu with organic and vegetarian dishes such as in Berlin.

 

Behind the gallery, visitors will discover the Eliasson waterfall 2019. This sculpture is characteristic of its fusion of nature with technology and its investigation of how we think and react to our environment.

 

This 11-meter-high work follows the succession of waterfalls presented in cities around the world, notably in Sydney in 1998, in New York in 2008, in São Paulo in 2011 and, finally, in Versailles in 2016.

 

More than just an exhibition, an unforgettable experience for visitors of all ages who will enjoy interacting with this living art.

Olafur Eliasson

Wavemachines, 1995

Acrylic, transparent plastic sheet, water, ink (yellow), motors, transformer

25 x 900 x 212 cm Installation view: Tate Modern, London, 2019

Photo: Anders Sune Berg Kunstmuseum Basel © 1995 Olafur Eliasson


Olafur Eliasson The Expanded Studio, 2019

Installation view: Tate Modern, London Photo: Anders Sune Berg © 2019 Olafur Eliasson