Art is divine

Emotions on canvas

Micha Christos

TATE MODERN

LONDRES

From January 23 to May 6, 2019

 

PIERRE BONNARD

THE COLOR OF MEMORY

Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

Window Open on the Seine (Vernon) (Fenêtre ouverte sur la Seine (Vernon)) 1911-12

Oil paint on canvas

780 x 1055 mm

(c) Ville de Nice Musée des Beaux-Arts Jules Chéret

Photo Muriel ANSSENS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The color of memory, presented at the Tate Modern in London, is the first major exhibition dedicated to the French artist Pierre Bonnard in the United Kingdom for 20 years.

Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

The Garden (Le Jardin) 1936

Oil paint on canvas

1270 x 1000 mm

Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris/ Roger-Viollet


Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

Nude Crouching in the Tub 1918

Oil paint on canvas

830 x 730 mm

Paris, musée d’Orsay

Photo © Musée d’Orsay, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais/Patrice Schmidt 

Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

Nude in an Interior c. 1935

Oil paint on canvas

1340 x 692 mm

National Gallery of Art, Washington, USA


Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

The Window (Le Fenêtre) 1925

Oil paint on canvas

1086 x 886 mm

Some one hundred of his best works from private collections and public institutions from around the world highlight the intense vibrant colors of modernity that revolutionized painting in the first half of the 20th century.

 

With the tip of his brush, Pierre Bonnard captures the time that passes with infinite tenderness. He gives eternity to memories in a cascade of emotions with intense colors.

During 35 years of a career, the artist has always appealed to his memory to revive on his sensual and melancholic paintings, landscapes and intimate scenes of his daily life.

 

The lively and joyous tints fill empty parts, moments that have disappeared. Stolen glances, seen from a window, furtive silhouettes arise from the past to linger on his paintings in unconventional compositions of his time.

 

Pierre Bonnard likes to represent quiet, contemplative characters, indifferent to the eyes of their spectators, just like his landscapes that nothing seems to disturb in the density of their foliage. His wife, Martha de Meligny, was ill all her life and had to be treated by hydrotherapy. Pierre Bonnard painted his intimate scenes of baths and toilet and his works are among the most emblematic. This intimate intimacy shared with his wife is a true psychological thread caught in delicate touches.


Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

Nude in the Bath (Nu dans le bain) 1936-8

Oil paint on canvas

930 x 1470 mm

Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris/ Roger-Viollet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The exhibition shows how much the work of introspection in his memories in pictures brings Pierre Bonnard to a kind of abstraction.

 

At the end of his life, the artist lived in the restrictions of war and in the perpetual anguish of the invasion in his retirement in Le Cannet, yet it was at that time that he painted panoramic views of gardens, reminiscing past landscapes in a dream of eternity.

Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

The Studio with Mimosas 1939-46

Oil paint on canvas

1275 x 1275 mm

Musée National d’Art Moderne - Centre Pompidou

Photo (C) Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais


Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947)

In the Bathroom c.1940

Oil paint on canvas

920 x 610 mm

Private Collection

Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

Self Portrait c.1938

Oil paint on Canvas

560 x 685 mm

Private Collection 

 

 

This great traveler of the soul, in love with nature, remains a "painter of happiness" whose rare sensitivity has been able to cross the currents of Fauvism, Nabis and Impressionism with a perfect mastery of colors and light.


Pierre Bonnard (1867 – 1947)

Summer 1917

Oil on canvas

2600 x 3400 mm

Fondation Marguerite et Aimé Maeght, Saint-Paul- France